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Parenting & Childcare

Maya Method: How To Get Kids To Do Chores

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erwin.mann
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Maya families in the Yucatan seems to have the secret to get kids voluntarily doing chores around the house.

There was no fuss. No nagging or whining. And there were no visible rewards.

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/09/01/641266260/how-to-get-kids-to-do-chores-does-the-maya-method-work
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erwin.mann
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Researchers have documented that kids in Mexico with ties to indigenous communities tend to be more helpful — and more likely to help voluntarily — than children without indigenous ancestry. The moms harness the power of toddlers — and their zest for being helpful. They encourage kids from ages 1 to 3 to watch and participate in chores, even though the toddlers aren't really competent. Over time, the moms say, children will become more capable while maintaining their eagerness to be helpful.

Here's how you can do it -
1. Make chores the fun activity of the day.
2. Welcome the 30-pound troll trying to stop you from finishing the chore.
3. Take your time with the chores.
4. Find a toddler-sized chunk of the task she can complete.
8 mths
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Do you think this will work? How do you get your kids to help around the house?
8 mths
jan.robertson
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Haha! This is probably too late for me since my daughter is already pre-teen. Maybe with my next one I can try this.
8 mths
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I started to do this with my toddler. She is 2 and likes to 'wash' her own cup, etc. She makes a mess and we take forever to finish the chore but she is enjoying it. Though I don't know if she'll be like the Maya kids in the future, I'm just happy that to make her happy, make her feel she has accomplished something.
8 mths
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I sent my kid to a Montessori school. They teach practical life skills there. Montessori method of teaching has been used for over a century. So, I will leave it to the experts.
8 mths
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I hate to say it but I bribe my kids to do chores. I know it's not the most ideal thing but at least they learn to do housework albeit grudgingly.
8 mths
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I don't think that teenagers, in general, will want to do chores willingly. It's just how they are wired. I think it's more effective to pay them for doing chores so they understand that hard work pays.
8 mths
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Giving a child a positive title when doing these tasks helps to reinforce the fact that they are being good and doing a good job. That way, they'll want to identify with it.
8 mths
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Ask for their help regularly. A few small tasks at the same time each week, even if it's just once or twice a week, is enough to make it a predictable part of their routine. While keeping chores within their routine, mix up their tasks a bit.
8 mths
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Here's a different article with a completely different approach - https://www.empoweringparents.com/article/ill-do-it-later6-ways-to-get-kids-to-do-chores-now/ This one suggests to use a reward system like some of you have already done.
8 mths
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Do you think a reward system is affective to get kids to do what you want or does it allow for kids to always expect something in return?
8 mths
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Do you think a reward system is affective to get kids to do what you want or does it allow for kids to always expect something in return?
I don't think that's a good idea. A 2016 article in the Atlantic, “Against the Sticker Chart,” warned me that rewarding kids for good behavior “can erode children’s innate tendency to help others.”

It will make kids expect something in return every time he does something. This is not something we want for their future.
8 mths
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Start them early. Kids of all ages can help around the house but their tasks should always be age-appropriate. The earlier you start asking them to help out, the sooner it will become part of their routine.
8 mths
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I don't think that's a good idea. A 2016 article in the Atlantic, “Against the Sticker Chart,” warned me that rewarding kids for good behavior “can erode children’s innate tendency to help others.”

It will make kids expect something in return every time he does something. This is not something we want for their future.
I agree. I was told, rewards could make kids callous and manipulative. I imagined my daughter leering at me: “How much will you pay me not to hit my sister with this ball?”
8 mths
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Do you think this will work? How do you get your kids to help around the house?
I disagree. Rewards can be useful in some situations and inappropriate in others, much like every other parenting tool. I don't think any kid liked doing chores. Heck, adults don't like doing chores but we know we have to do it because you've reached a level of maturity.
8 mths