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Millennials are serial job hoppers!

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Caroline.Hall
Caroline.HallHost

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Reports are mixed on if millennials are actually job-hopping more frequently than previous generations. What is clear is that job-hopping is becoming the norm for the average twenty something.

One LinkedIn study says millennials job-hop more than their predecessors, however this only contains data LinkedIn members actually report. Gen X and Baby Boomer members of the site may be less likely to report their extended history of employment, but rather the few most recent jobs.

On the flip side, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that Baby Boomers job-hopped in their twenties just as frequently as millennials do now.

Regardless of the assumptions and unclear conclusions around young employees, I’m convinced that they shouldn’t apologize for job-hopping. A Careerbuilder survey showed that 45% of employees plan to stay with their employer for less than two years, so we ought to get comfortable with the idea.

Millennials can earn a higher salary, grow their career, change locations more frequently, and find a better cultural fit from job-hopping. The negative stigma is on its way out, so people should lean into the positive outcomes from making a change. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kaytiezimmerman/2016/06/07/millennials-stop-apologizing-for-job-hopping/#43a7bdcc4656
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Caroline.Hall
Caroline.Hall followed this discussion
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Many assume millennials are just chasing money when they job-hop, rather than waiting patiently for their slice of the pie as their seniors did. However, that’s not true of all job-hoppers. Many employees who seek other jobs early on are willing to take pay cuts for the right job, especially if there is a mismatch or lack of positive work culture. Other factors for switching jobs quickly include having too much work to do, resulting in an uneven work-life balance. Environmental and social consciousness drives millennials, caring about their fellow man. When a company’s mission matches their values, millennials are in — more likely for a longer haul than their last gig.
7 mths
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Should millennials be apologetic about being serial job hoppers?
7 mths
lumko-potelwa
lumko-potelwa followed this discussion
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Hell no. Nobody needs to apologize for changing jobs.
7 mths
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Changing jobs is a personal choice. In my opinion (as an employer and someone from the Baby Boomer generation), some people do change jobs too often / too quickly without adequate justification.
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If there is no promotion path at all, the bonus structure you were promised vanishes, the stock options become worthless, etc., then it's time to move on.
7 mths
Host
In some industries and at some companies - frequent job changes by a candidate may not be viewed as a negative. Clearly it depends on the reasons for the job changes. If you are fired for poor performance within your first year of employment at several jobs, there is a problem. If you quit several jobs after only 6–9 months because you are “bored” or “don’t like” the job or the company rules or the manager or the team - then you may be viewed as a problem employee. But if you change jobs a few times on average every 18–36 months - with improvement in your role or for some other growth reason - then your employment experience may be viewed as useful diversity.
7 mths
Host
No, there is no need to apologize if a job isn't returning on the investment of your time and dedication to it. A job isn't just a paycheck. A job should have a clear career path and should give you new experience and skills to grow in your career.
7 mths
Host
The only time I think someone should be “apologetic” is when they take a job they clearly have no intention of committing to at all. For example, taking a job to get a relo package just to have a paid move to an area and immediately quit to take a different job. But, most relo packages require a payback if you quit too soon anyway.
7 mths
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Time is precious. We can't waste it on a job that will no longer contribute to our planned career success.
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Job hopping isn’t without its drawbacks: after “hopping” two or three times, it can become difficult for a person to advance into senior positions: their current employer won’t promote them because they don’t want to give a lot of responsibility to a person that has a history of job hopping, and external recruiters stop calling for the same reason. So job hoppers bear risk in bouncing around; they could very well hit a career wall as a result of their employment history.
7 mths
Host
No, you should never stay in a position that you find unsatisfactory, or that limits your growth in the direction you want to move in. Also, in many modern fields job hopping will yield more financial growth than staying.
7 mths
Host
Millennials need to realize that loyalty is extremely important and that it goes both ways. Job hopping is never a good thing and only makes it harder to land jobs in the future when you are considered a “flight risk.”
7 mths
Host
aku gak ngerti ni pada ngomong apa ya...
7 mths
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Loyalty is a two way street. If you have the right place you will want to stay.
7 mths
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7 mths