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Why Kids Still Living w/ Parents?

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freya-morgensen
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Millennials are now more likely to live at home with their parents over any other living arrangement - a first for the age group in modern history, according to a new study.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/millennials-living-with-parents-first-time-history-a7047286.html
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freya-morgensen
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The latest Pew Research Centre report shows that 32.1 per cent of young adults - defined as between the ages of 18 and 34 - live in their parents’ home.

Much of this, the report says, has to do with shifts in marital statuses of young adults, as fewer choose to find a spouse before the age of 35. The most common living arrangement for the age group since 1880 had been with a spouse. That figure peaked in 1960, when 62 per cent of young adults had this living situation.

In 2014, only 31.6 per cent of young adults lived with a spouse or partner.

The report notes, however, that the number of young adults living in a parent’s home is not a record high. In 1940, 35 per cent of 18 to 34 year-olds lived with a parent.

Factors such as race, gender, education, and employment status also played into the living situations of young adults in 2014.
7 mths
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What's your opinion on this? Do you think it's a failure on the parent's part that the kids are still living with them until they are 35?
7 mths
christopher.may
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I moved back in after I graduated from college, and I started working within a month. However, I work in an expensive area, and I don't make enough money at my current jobs to afford to move out immediately.

Plus, student loans. Ugh.
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7 mths
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"Same here but I am not as young and I am pregnant (Baby Daddy is a douche). Haha My parents were pleased to have me back (possibly more pleased than I was, but I do love them.

I don't pay “rent” or for food, but the assumption is that I would do most of the household chores and upkeep in my free time."
7 mths
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I think it's based on a number of factors. In the area I grew up in I think that a lot of kids were given a false sense of what"adult life" should be like and grew up with a distorted sense of the living standard that they diserved and a very deep rooted sense of entitlement to the finer things . I think a lot of our parents grew up in somewhat harder times and didn't want their kids to struggle or go through pain like they didm but in not wanting us to struggle we also never learned how to work for things and the rewards of the struggle and the charachter it builds. This doesn't apply to every situation but is something to think about. Sometimes I wish my parents had allowed me to fail a bit more and experience some pain. Would have made adjusting to adult life a bit easier . The way out economy is now is not exactly helpful for getting started these days. Things are a lot harder than they used to be in that sense . In most cases I think it's unhealthy to live with your parents past 25 but sometimes it can't be helped. As a parent it will be hard to figure out what the balance is between enabling and love . The road to hell is paved with good intentions and I really do believe that parents can love their kids to death and do very deep and permanent damage developmentally by not allowing their kids to grow .
7 mths
Host
I lived in LA for two years before moving back. My father nearly died of heart failure due to a heavily calcified valve that needed to be replaced. Since his replacement he’s been doing much better, but I’m staying here for the time being because both he and my mother have been in extremely poor health and could use the help.
7 mths
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I'm GenX, but I'm living with my parents. I moved in after my divorce, to reduce expenses and pay off some debts. I found that after having lived apart, I got along much better with my parents. They also like having me around the house. Part of my rent is that on Sunday, I spend a couple of hours doing whatever's needed around the house. My mother is much less mobile than she used to be, so this helps her out as much as it helps me.
7 mths
Host
I haven’t lived with my parents since I left college. I was gone out of state for four years, lived with my (lovely) parents for a year, and I just couldn’t hang. Once you have your own spot, it’s super hard to live with someone else again.
7 mths
Host
Nothing wrong with living with your parents as long as both parties are OK with it and you are willing to do”your share”, whatever is agreed upon. Whether or not you pay “rent” or for groceries is entirely up to the parents but, in my opinion, it should be more than an assumption that you help with the upkeep of the home. Just because you have a busy schedule doesn’t mean you can slack off helping. If you were living alone and working, you’d have to do it all and PAY for it all.
7 mths
Host
Nothing wrong with living with your parents as long as both parties are OK with it and you are willing to do”your share”, whatever is agreed upon. Whether or not you pay “rent” or for groceries is entirely up to the parents but, in my opinion, it should be more than an assumption that you help with the upkeep of the home. Just because you have a busy schedule doesn’t mean you can slack off helping. If you were living alone and working, you’d have to do it all and PAY for it all.
I totally agree! I try to help out whenever I can even if I am pregnant. It's also nice that my parents would be here to help when the baby is born because I can't afford a full time nanny.
7 mths
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In my case, I lived with my biological parents until I ran away at 26 for the umpteenth and final time, because they lost custody for 6 years and were unwilling to let go. It seems to be the case with a LOT of Millennials; there seems to be a lot of unhealthily enmeshed parents, especially mothers, who employ endless emotional blackmail at the very least. Sons seem to get coddled, daughters exploited. Sons eventually get exploited too but they seem to largely be golden children, though my home state seems to be very bad for forcing traditional gender roles on women *gaaaaag*
7 mths
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For my first, second, third, and half of my fourth year at university, I lived in the city, on campus. Halfway through that fourth year, my grandma was diagnosed with terminal cancer, and I became very depressed - I know from experience that when I’m depressed I tend to avoid all human contact for days, or weeks on end (which makes it ultimately worse), and since my family was going through a tough time it seemed like the best choice to move back home and commute to university.

By living at home, I can get better support from my family for my mental health, better support them in times of need, and I’m saving at least £380 per month on expenses.
7 mths
Host
I think living with parents helps you a lot. it makes u a stronger person. U can share your insecurities without thinking how it will be a perseived. moreover our parents need someone to rely on.
7 mths
Host
Partly my fault as a parent for never pushing them into independence. Partly their fault for feeling entitled to do so and partly due to the difficulties in financially breaking free unlike my experience.
7 mths
Host
I don't think you can judge all people and circumstances with the same brush, your question is kind of broad. If divorce or something unforeseen happens, its absolutely not the fault of the parents but if you raised entitled brats who do not know how to work or exist, then this is your karma!
7 mths